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Mountain Women

 The Lives of Pearl Brewster Moore and Edmée Moore Reid of Banff 

This website was researched and written by Amie Lalonde, Archives Assistant, as part of the Young Canada Works at Building Careers in Heritage Internship Program.

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A Brewster Story

The Brewster Family, 1898. 

Pat Brewster fonds, V91/PA - 671, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

In 1888 John Brewster, following the advice of his brother William, moved to Banff with the aim of starting a dairy farm to supply the Banff Springs Hotel and the budding town. The following year his wife Isabella (neé Thompson) and their four sons, Bill, Jim, Fred, and George, came to join him. In July of 1889 their only daughter, Pearl Evelyn Brewster, was born in Banff. Two more children, Jack and Forrest Oliver (Pat) followed in 1893 and 1896. 

The Brewster family became one of the most prominent families in Banff, in part due to the efforts of the two eldest Brewster children, Bill and Jim Brewster. Bill and Jim began guiding in 1892 at the ages of 12 and 10 when they helped escort a fishing party to Sawback Lake. In 1900 Bill and Jim created W. & J. Brewster Guides and Packers which would later become the Brewster Transport Company. Investments from Philip A. Moore and Fred Hussey in 1904 helped the Brewster business grow, and over the decades it expanded into a huge enterprise. A popular saying about the Brewsters that is still remembered today (look out for it on a wall in the Heritage Gallery) is: “tourists came to the Rockies for a change and a rest. The Canadian Pacific Railway took the change, and the Brewsters took the rest.” The growth and success of the Brewster Transport Company and the Brewster involvement in the community in Banff led them to be known as the “Royal Family of the Rockies.” 

The Brewsters during a trail ride, [ca. 192?]

Jim Brewster family fonds, V90/PA - 563a, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Gathering of John Brewster family on steps of Colonel Moore home, [ca. 1940]

Fred Brewster fonds, V86/PA - 91, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

 
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Pearl Brewster
A Western Original 

Pearl Brewster was born on July 25, 1889. Pearl was the fifth of seven Brewster children, and the only girl.

As the only daughter in the Brewster family, Pearl was often tasked with watching her youngest brother Pat. By age twelve, Pearl grew tired of watching her five year old brother and hatched a plan. She repeatedly suggested to her mother that her father, who was at the time at a ranch in Kananaskis, was lonely and that Pat - the only child too young to attend school -- should be sent to Kananaskis to keep him company. Eventually her mother agreed and Pearl's last duty of caring for her brother was walking Pat to the train station. 

Pearl Irvine Brewster, two years old. March, 1892

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 182, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

"To our faithful guides Pearl and George, Stony [sic] Squaw. September 1899" 

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 183, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 

Pearl and Pat Brewster, Kananaskis, [ca. 1899]

Moore family fonds, V91/PA - 38, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Pearl and Pat Brewster, 1904

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 187, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Pearl Brewster, [ca. 1905]

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 184, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Pearl attended school in Banff beginning in 1895. Other students at this early Banff school included her brothers and the children of other early Banff families such as Ada and Rene Wilson, Stella White (cousin of Peter Whyte), and Tressa (Lade) Bagley who would later marry Pearl's brother Jim.

In her late teens Pearl was sent east to finishing schools in Toronto, Ontario and Connecticut. However, despite her years at eastern boarding schools, the mountains remained Pearl’s home and she took full advantage of this mountain home throughout her life.  

Attendance Register for National Park School District #102. 1897-1898

Banff School District No. 102 fonds, M4/2/005, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

[School picture, Banff. Pearl is in the front row wearing a black dress. Jim Brewster is at the top right, ca.1896] 

Jim Brewster family fonds, V90/PA - 472, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Pearl Brewster and Dorothy Hall, Wyckham Rise School, 1906. 

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 278, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Pearl began riding horses and exploring the mountains at a young age. By the time she was a teenager she was an accomplished rider, having trained her horse, Guerney, to walk on two legs. Pearl also held a big game license and the head of a bighorn sheep she shot on Mount Edith hangs in the living room of the Moore home to this day. 

While Pearl enjoyed just getting out in nature she was also fond of more organized sports such as hockey and skiing. Pearl was an accomplished hockey player, playing until well into her forties. Her team, the Calgary Regents, were Champions of Western Canada in 1917, 1919, and 1920. Her love of hockey was an interest she shared with her husband Philip Moore, who played with Bill and Jim Brewster. 

"The

Greatest Horsewoman

in the West"

"At Home." [Pearl on horseback with Tunnel Mountain and Mount Rundle in the background, ca. 190?] 

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 229, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Resident's Big Game License, Mrs. P.A. Moore of Banff, 1911

Moore family fonds, M307/33/138, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 

Pearl on Guerney, the horse she taught to walk on its hind legs, [ca. 190?]

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 239, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Pearl on Pat's donkey "Maude," before 1907

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 215, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 

"Calgary Regents win Alpine Cup from Vancouvers. Lady Hockey Teams Put Up Splendid Exhibition at Banff Carnival." 1921.

Moore family fonds, M307/34/150, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Regents Ladies Hocky [sic] Club, Champions of Western Canada 1917 - 19 - 20, [ca 1920]

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 280, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

[Studio portrait of a women's hockey team. Pearl Brewster Moore at centre, ca. 191?]

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 279, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

[Pearl on skis in the snow, ca. 192?]

Moore family fonds, V439/PD - 358/6/001, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 

Philip A. Moore

In 1902, Bill and Jim Brewster represented the Canadian Pacific Railway at the Sportsman’s show in New York. There they met two young Princeton students, Philip Moore and Fred Hussey. Hussey and Moore arranged a trip to Banff later that year and quickly became friends with the Brewsters. Moore and Hussey each invested $25,000 in the Brewster company in 1904, which was rebranded as Brewster Brothers at that time. 

Working closely with Bill and Jim Brewster, Philip Moore got to know their adventurous sister Pearl. They were engaged in 1906 and on 15 January, 1907, Pearl Evelyn Brewster and Philip Augustus Moore were married at St. George’s Church in Banff. That spring they built their log home at the corner of what is now Banff Avenue and Fox street.

 

Their only child, Edmée Moore, was born on 5 September, 1908 in Banff. 

Pearl Brewster and Philip Moore's wedding party on the steps of John Brewster's residence, 1907

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 417, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

[Philip and Pearl Moore, ca. 193?]

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 432, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

[Pearl and Philip Moore, ca. 193?]

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 430, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

[Pearl and Philip Moore, ca. 194?]

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 438, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Runt [Philip Moore] and Edmée [Moore], ca. 1908

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 419, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 

[Studio portrait of Edmée Moore as a toddler, ca. 1909]

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 304, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

[Pearl, Philip, and Edmée Moore, ca. 193?]

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 435, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 

 
 
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Into the Mountains

Address to the Trail Riders of the Canadian Rockies by Pearl Moore, ca. 1934

Moore family fonds, M307/30/70, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 

Growing up in the Rockies instilled Pearl with a great appreciation for the outdoors. An avid rider, Pearl became the first woman President of the Trail Riders of the Canadian Rockies from 1933 to 1934. The Trail Riders was a Canadian Pacific Railway-sponsored group that began in 1923 and took men and women from all walks of life on rides throughout the back country of the Rocky Mountains. Prior to becoming President, Pearl served as Vice President from 1925 to 1933. Pearl, Philip, and Edmée Moore were all active participants in the group and attended numerous trail rides in the 1920s and 1930s. Pearl would often ride ahead of the pack with Philip Moore to take advantage of fishing and quiet. Though she stopped riding later in life, Pearl continued to contribute to the Trail Riders in some capacity well into the 1960s. 

Pearl was also a member of the Skyline Trail Hikers but preferred to explore the backcountry on horseback. 

Trail Riders of the Canadian Rockies, Trail Ride to the Lake of the Hanging Glaciers card, 1928. 
Moore family fonds, M307/33/132.1, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 

Peter Whyte, Cyril Paris, Pearl Moore, Mrs. Brodwick, and Raymond Young going up Sulphur Mountain, [ca. 191?]

George Paris fonds, V484/PA - 46, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 

[Trail ride. Pearl Moore third from left. George Vaux X, [John Murray] Gibbon at right, ca. 1930] 

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 233, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 

[Norman Sanson, unidentified woman, and Pearl Moore in camp. ca. 193?]

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 236, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 

Trail Riders of the Canadian Rockies Certificate of Life Membership, Mrs. Philip A. Moore, 1928

Moore family fonds, M307/33/146, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Trail Songs - Trail Riders of the Canadian Rockies
00:00 / 00:00

Trail Riders Meeting. Listen to the trail Riders sing Happy Birthday to Pearl and other trail songs.

Peter and Catharine Whyte fonds, S37/20, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 

[Pearl Moore on horseback, ca. 193?]

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 228, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Pearl and Runt [Philip Moore] on Palliser trip, [ca. 191?]  

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 242, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 

Riders of the Traill Will Start Long Trek From Banff, 9 June 1934. 

Moore family fonds, M307/34/151, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 

Summer was a busy time for the Moores. In addition to hikes and trail rides, the Moores were also involved in running Canadian Pacific Railway bungalow camps in Yoho National Park: Wapta Lake camp in 1921 and Yoho Valley camp at Takakkaw Falls through 1932. During the later 1920s Philip was Recreational Director for the Banff Springs hotel and Pearl managed the Yoho camp alone. These camps were designed to give tourists a rustic, informal resort experience and to make up for the downturn in rail travel in the age of the automobile. 

Pearl and Philip Moore at Yoho Camp, [ca. 192?]

Moore family fonds, V439/PD/358/9/002, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Yoho Camp, Yoho National Park, [ca. 192?]

Moore family fonds, V439/PD/358/9/001, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Wapta Camp, Yoho National Park, [ca. 192?]

Moore family fonds, V439/PD/358/5/001, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 

 
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Edmée Moore Reid

The only child of Pearl and Philip Moore, Edmée Moore was born on September 5th ,1908 in Banff.

Edmée spent summers in and around Banff including at Yoho and Wapta camps in Yoho National Park. She was an avid rider and participated in numerous trail rides with the Trail Riders of the Canadian Rockies along with her parents. 

In the 1920s and early 1930s Edmée spent many winters in various American cities such as New York, Boston, Chicago, Washington D.C., and San Francisco while her father travelled around  the United States giving lectures. In these cities Edmée attended school, went shopping with her mother, and went to numerous galleries, museum, shows, and sporting events such as hockey games. At the end of every winter the Moores would take the train back to Banff before going on to the camps at Yoho and Wapta. Edmée was a dedicated diary writer and, in diaries from 1926, 1928, and 1930 she writes about her daily life in Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, Banff and surrounding area. Visits from Peter Whyte and Louis S. Crosby in Boston, trail rides in the summers, Banff Indian Days, and hanging out with friends at Yoho camp are just some of the events she highlights in her diary. 

On February 7th, 1942 Edmée Moore married Charlie Reid in the same church her parents had married in thirty-five years earlier. Edmée continued to live in Banff until her death in 1971.

[Teenage Edmée Moore, ca. 192?]

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 320, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

[Edmée Moore as a toddler in a crate marked "Banff," ca. 1910]

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 303, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Edmée Brewster Moore, 2 years old, [ca. 1910]

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 307, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Brookman, [Edmée Moore], Betty, [ca. 1912]

Moore family fonds,  V439/PD - 358/7/001, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Edmée Moore and John Brewster, ca. 191?

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 316, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

"Girl Trail Rider Ro Play 'Broncho' Organ on 4-Day T, [ca. 192?]

Moore family fonds, M307/47/37, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

[Group at camp, Philip Moore at left and Edmée Moore at right, ca. 193?]

Pat Brewster fonds, V91/PA - 848, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

[Edmée Moore standing in a camp, ca. 1925-1935] 

Moore family fonds, V439/PD - 360/5/001, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

"With fond recollections of the most enjoyable summer ever spent at Yoho Camp," [page from Edmée Moore's photograph album,] 1926

Moore family fonds, V439/PD - 358/32, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

"Trail Riders of 1925. O'Hara and Wapta," [page from Edmée Moore's photograph album,] 1925

Moore family fonds, V439/PD - 358/31, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

[Album page showing Edmée Moore and friends, including [Georgia Engelhard], [Fern Brewster], and Rudolph Aemmer, ca. 1925 - 1935]

Moore family fonds, V439/PD - 360/008, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

[Edmée Moore with friends, including Georgia Engelhard, in a tent. ca. 1925 - 1935]

Moore family fonds, V439/PD - 360/6/001, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Trail Riders of the Canadian Rockies Certificate of Life Membership for Miss Edmée Moore, [ca. 19??]

Moore family fonds, M307/47/038, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 

[Edmée Moore and Charlie Reid on their wedding day, 1942]

Jim Brewster family fonds, 

V90/PA - 511, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

[Edmée Moore on her wedding day, 1942]

Jim Brewster family fonds, V90/PA - 512, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

"Miss [Edmée] Moore becomes Bride Of Mr. C.E. Reid," 1942

Moore family fonds, 

M307/47/041, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 

[Pearl and Edmée Moore, ca. 196?]

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 440, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

 
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Legacy:
The Moore Home

Pearl Moore in front of the Moore house, 1969. 

Helen Wells fonds, V675/PA - 37, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 

[Edmée Moore standing in the living room of the Moore house, ca. 193?] 

Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 329, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

The Moore home was built in 1907 at the corner of what is now Fox Street and Banff Avenue. After Philip's mother died in 1925, Philip and Pearl inherited much of her furniture and in the early 1930s the Moore home was remodelled to make room. Interior walls were knocked out to make larger rooms and the walls of most rooms (excluding the living room) on the main floor were painted a light colour. The eye-catching blue shutters -- the colour of Pearl's favourite flower Larkspur -- were also added at this time. 

Both Pearl and Philip Moore were avid collectors and filled the walls and surfaces of their home with objects from their travels: objects from Indigenous peoples, furs, and taxidermied animals they had shot. By 1947, Pearl had started to think about how to house and preserve their collections of Indigenous clothing and artefacts and began to discuss this with Peter and Catharine Whyte. 

In 1971, Pearl donated her house to the Peter Whyte Foundation and it was moved from its original location at Fox Street and Banff Avenue to its current location on Bear Street. She lived there in its new location until her death in 1973 (Philip Moore had passed away in 1951). In her will, Pearl left all her Indigenous clothing, beadwork, and artifacts along with all taxidermy and animal skins to Catharine Whyte in trust for the Archives of the Canadian Rockies. The trustees of her will were also given discretion to distribute the rest of her belongings, most of which were kept in her home for display to the public. 

 

With the donation of her home and possessions to the Whyte Museum, Pearl did her part to help preserve a collection of Indigenous clothing, artefacts, and natural objects. The Moore home is located on the property of the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies and is available for tours. The papers and artifacts that belonged to Pearl, Philip, and Edmée Moore are an important part of the collections held at the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies in the Art and Heritage collections and in the Archives and Library

Moving of Pearl Moore house from Banff Avenue to site next to the Archives, 1971. 

Peter and Catharine Whyte Foundation fonds, V692/PA - 133a/085, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Moving of Pearl Moore house from Banff Avenue to site next to the Archives, 1971. 

Peter and Catharine Whyte Foundation fonds, V692/PA - 133a/101, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Moving of Pearl Moore house from Banff Avenue to site next to the Archives, 1971. 

Peter and Catharine Whyte Foundation fonds, V692/PA - 133a/088, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Moving of Pearl Moore house from Banff Avenue to site next to the Archives, Pearl Moore standing next to her house,1971. 

Peter and Catharine Whyte Foundation fonds, V692/PA - 133a/135, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

The Moore house in 2009.

 
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A Mountain Town

Banff Indian Days

For much of Pearl’s life, the town of Banff was host to a multi-day event called Banff Indian Days in the summer. This event, which is believed to have started in 1894, (the date is contested, some believe 1899) during summer floods that stranded a trainload of tourists at the Banff Springs hotel. It is said that, at the request of the hotel manager, Tom Wilson approached Chief Hector Crawler and asked if he would bring a group of Stoney Nakoda to Banff to entertain the tourists with a parade and dances. A version of the event was held sporadically until 1911 when it became an annual festival that would last until 1978.

Banff Indian Days grew from a one-day event to one that spanned three to five days. Tourists flocked to the event year after year with attendance reaching a peak in 1922 when 71,540 tourists attended. Banff Indian Days consisted of a daily parade where Stoney Nakoda (and other First Nations such as the Tsuu t’ina, Siksika (Blackfoot), Cree and Ktunaxa (Kootenay)) men, women, and children could show off their regalia for prize money, as well as dances, musical performances, horse and foot races, and a rodeo competition. For the Indigenous participants, Banff Indian Days was an opportunity to participate in activities that they were actively discouraged from doing on the reserve. The prizes given out for the best regalia during the parade were also of great economic value to the Indigenous participants. Banff Indian Days was also an opportunity for Indigenous participants to leave their reserves – to visit spaces that had long been sacred to them and see distant relatives – as until the 1940s, a pass had to be obtained from an Indian Agent to leave the reserve.

Pearl was involved in Banff Indian Days throughout her life and was often asked to be a judge for the parade.  

Pearl’s relationship with the Stoney Nakoda stemmed from her childhood and the Brewster relationship with several Stoney Nakoda families and individuals, most notably William Twin who accompanied her brothers Bill and Jim on their first guiding excursion. This longstanding relationship resulted in both her and Philip Moore being adopted by the Stoney Nakoda as Princess and Chief in 1948. In a letter to her mother, Catharine Whyte discussed the quiet ceremony, saying “I asked [Pearl] about being taken into the Stoneys but she couldn’t tell us much. They sing a song and say a prayer and sing God Save the King and she and Runt [Philip Moore] each got some present of clothing I think. She is now a princess… and Runt is a chief.” 

[Pearl judging regalia at Banff Indian Days, ca. 195?]
Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 271, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 
[Pearl Moore at Banff Indian Days, ca. 196?]
Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 272.1, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 
[Pearl judging regalia at Banff Indian Days, ca. 196?]
Moore family fonds, V439/NS - 274, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

Banff Winter Carnival & Volunteer Work

While Banff Indian Days was the major event of the summer, the winter played host to Banff Winter Carnival beginning in 1917. The Winter Carnival consisted of events such as skating, swimming at the hot springs, snowshoeing, curling, hockey, downhill ski and ski jumping events at Mount Norquay, tobogganing, barbecues, and the crowning of a Carnival Queen.

 

Pearl was crowned Carnival Queen in 1920, and her hockey team, the Calgary Regents, often played at the Carnival. She was also a part of the organizing committee, most notably during the Second World War. 

During the Second World War, the proceeds of the 1941 Winter Carnival were dedicated to the war effort. The major organizing group for the Banff war effort was the Banff-Jasper Spitfire fund, of which Pearl was Chair. The fundraisers organized by this group included a mile of pennies, the auctioning of paintings by well known artists such as Carl Rungius, Nicholas de Grandmaison, as well as local Peter Whyte. The Banff-Jasper Spitfire Fund Committee also auctioned a 1941 Ford Sedan. 

Ladies broomball at the Banff Carnival, [ca. 192?]
Moore family fonds, V439/PD/358/27/004, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies
Shorty Russick. Winner of the Dog Derby for the Strongheart Trophy. Banff Carnival, 1922
Moore family fonds, V439/PD/358/43/001, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies
"Mrs. Philip A. Moore, "Carnival Queen,
 1920." [Banff Winter Carnival pamphlet, 1921]
Moore family fonds, M307/34/159, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies
"Spitfire Fund $7,000 on Way to Objective", 1942
Moore family fonds, 
M307/41/067, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies
"Ford Sedan To Be Drawn For In Aid of Spitfire Fund", 1941
Moore family fonds, M307/41/020, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies
Banff-Jasper Spitfire Fund sticker
Moore family fonds, M307/40/006, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies
Handwritten raffle ticket for a Ford Sedan to raise money for the Spitfire Fund, [1941]
Moore family fonds, M307/40/008, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

The Characters of Banff

As a prominent family in Banff the Moores had a wide social circle filled with both locals, and visitors who came to climb, ride, paint, and write. 

 

Having grown up in Banff, Pearl was well acquainted with the White family and Peter Whyte. When the Moores were in Boston in 1926 Peter Whyte, then at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, was a frequent visitor at the Moore residence. In 1930, while managing the Canadian Pacific Railway camp at Yoho National Park, Pearl met Catharine Whyte for the first time and they stayed friends throughout their lives.

 

Through the Trail Riders of the Canadian Rockies, Pearl, Philip, and Edmée met other distinguished residents and visitors to Banff such as George Vaux X, John Murray Gibbon (founding member of the group), and Carl Rungius (President in 1929). The Moores were also friends with Mary J. Vaux, Mary Vaux Walcott, Mary Schäffer Warren, and Georgia Engelhard who was a frequent participant on trail rides and a friend of Edmée’s.  

Pearl Moore, Philip Moore, Catharine Whyte, Carl Rungius, Peter Whyte, and John Murray Gibbon at Ptarmigan Valley, 1939
Peter and Catharine Whyte fonds, V683/III/A/15/PA - 624, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies
Breaking ground for the Whyte Museum, Pearl Moore, Sam Ward, Sydney R. Vallance, Catharine Robb Whyte, "Pat" Brewster, William A. Brewster, [1967] 
Peter and Catharine Whyte Foundation fonds, V982/PA - 133c/1a, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies
Edmée [Moore] Reid, Carl Rungius, [ca. 194?]
Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 336, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies
Pearl Moore and Dave White Sr., [ca. 193?] 
Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 203, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies
Pearl Moore and [Ada Wilson],
ca. 192?
Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 258, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies
Pearl Moore and Mary Schäffer Warren, [ca. 193?]
Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 248, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies
Pearl Moore and George Vaux X, [ca. 1930] 
Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 235, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies
Pearl Moore on Fred Hussey's horse, Star. Stella Painter, Sammy Read, [ca. 192?]
Moore family fonds, V439/PA - 241, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 
Pearl Moore, Mary J. Vaux, Philip Moore, and Edmée Moore at Yoho, [ca. 192?]
George Vaux X fonds, V654/I/A/PA - 16, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies 
Pearl Moore and Mary Vaux Walcott at Yoho, [ca. 193?]
George Vaux X fonds, V654/I/A/PA - 14, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies
Christmas card from the Peter and Catharine Whyte to the Moore family, [ca. 1930 - 1950] 
Moore family fonds, M307/48/23, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies